RATS

horror69

Rats

Rats (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

James Herbert, Britain’s Stephen King, dies at 69

By Matt Schudel,March 22, 2013
  • In this Feb. 3, 2000 file photo, British author James Herbert poses for a photograph in London. James Herbert, whose bestselling spine-tinglers included "The Rats" and "The Fog," died Wednesday, March 20, 2013 at the age of 69.

James Herbert, a best-selling author of horror novels whose books about mutant flesh-eating rats, Nazi-inspired plagues and children seized by malevolent forces made him the British counterpart to Stephen King, died March 20 at his home in Sussex, England. He was 69.

Ghosts came to life in his books, quaint country cottages possessed deadly powers, plagues were unleashed on innocent victims, and the little voice in the back of people’s heads commanded them to commit unspeakable crimes.

His first book, “The Rats,” was published in 1974 — the same year King published his debut novel, “Carrie.

In “The Rats” and two sequels, Mr. Herbert described an apocalyptic London overrun by giant rodents that organized themselves into armies and developed a taste for human flesh.

In his second novel, “The Fog” (1975), Mr. Herbert envisioned a dystopia in which a chemical released into the environment caused people to lose their moral compass and commit horrible crimes. In that book, a 747 jumbo jet deliberately crashed into a tower in London.

With his third novel, the ghost story The Survivor, Herbert used supernatural horror rather than the science fiction horror of his first two books.horror37

In Shrine, he explored his Roman Catholic heritage with the story of an apparent miracle which turns out to be something much more sinister.

English: There is no fear, until we make it up.

English: There is no fear, until we make it up. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 Haunted, the story of a sceptical paranormal investigator taunted by malicious ghosts, began life as a screenplay for the BBC, though this was not the screenplay used in the eventual film version. Its sequel was The Ghosts of Sleath. Others of Herbert’s books, such as MoonSepulchre and Portent, are structured as thrillers, and include espionage and detective story elements along with the supernatural.

The Jonah is in large part the story of a police investigation, albeit by a policeman whose life is overshadowed by a supernatural presence.

 The Spear deals with a neo-Nazi cult in Britain and an international conspiracy which includes a right-wing US general and an arms dealer.

Reviewing “The Rats” under a pseudonym for Britain’s Observer newspaper, Amis noted Mr. Herbert’s graphic depiction of rats devouring a child and said such scenes were “enough to make a rodent retch . . . and enough to make any human pitch the book aside.”

James Herbert was born April 8, 1943, in a working-class section of London. His parents were fruit mongers.

He grew up in a Dickensian neighborhood where Jack the Ripper had supposedly roamed in the 19th century.

Cartoon, with poem: Caption & poem lyrics: :: ...

Cartoon, with poem: Caption & poem lyrics: :: THE NEMESIS OF NEGLECT. :: “There floats a phantom on the slum’s foul air, :: Shaping, to eyes which have the gift of seeing, :: Into the Spectre of that loathly lair. :: Face it–for vain is fleeing! :: Red-handed, ruthless, furtive, unerect, :: ‘Tis murderous Crime–the Nemesis of Neglect! ” (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s